Home > Plague locust incursion highlights need for responsible pesticide risk management, reports Meat & Livestock Australia

Plague locust incursion highlights need for responsible pesticide risk management, reports Meat & Livestock Australia

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article image Plague locust control will require sound pesticide risk management

As rural communities across Australia are confronted with potentially serious plague locust incursions, Meat & Livestock Australia highlights the need for farmers to exercise responsible pesticide risk management practises.

Many chemical control options available for use against locusts will require grain and livestock producers to adhere to strict withholding periods (WHPs) and export intervals (EIs).

Meat & Livestock Australia’s Manager of Production Integrity and Assurance, Patrick Hutchinson, says that it is important livestock exporters focus on the bigger picture and institute sound pesticide risk management procedures.

"It is critical to carry out best-practice management to protect our agricultural industries as a whole," he says.

This extends beyond the choice of chemicals used in pesticide spraying, he notes, and encompasses sound and accurate record keeping.

Mr Hutchinson explains that " grain and livestock producers need to ensure they are vigilant in filling out their vendor declaration forms when selling any feed grain or oilseeds, fodder or moving or selling livestock that may have been affected by locust control chemicals."

Livestock can be exposed to pesticides by:

  • direct overspraying
  • grazing pastures or crops that have been sprayed or onto which spray has drifted; and
  • consuming fodder such as hay, silage or grain that has been sprayed directly or exposed to spray drift.
To exercise best-practice pesticide risk management, Mr Hutchinson recommends that regardless of which chemicals are used, farmers should always check and observe the relevant withholding periods (WHPs) and export intervals (EIs).

Records of any pesticide spraying activities should also be kept, he says, and appropriate vendor declarations should be correctly and accurately filled when selling stock or supplying feed to other producers.

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